journey


journey
journey, voyage, tour, trip, jaunt, excursion, cruise, expedition, pilgrimage mean travel or a passage from one place to another.
Journey, the most comprehensive term in general use, carries no particular implications of the distance, duration, destination, purpose, or mode of transportation involved
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plans a journey to California

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wished him a happy journey home

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the journey to Italy will not take more than two months

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a journey of twenty-five miles in Britain will often afford . . . much variety of scenery— Stamp

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the sound film took four years to make the journey from Hollywood to Rome— Jarratt

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Voyage normally implies a journey of some length over water, especially a sea or ocean
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with a fair sea voyage, and a fair land journey, you will be soon at his dear side— Dickens

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Gordon made the voyage from San Francisco around the Horn on a big full-rigged Glasgow sailing ship— Current Biog.

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but sometimes it may indicate a journey through air or space
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through the long 109-day, 180,000,000 mile voyage, Mariner was precisely controlled— Christian Science Monitor

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Tour applies to a somewhat circular journey from place to place that ends when one reaches one's starting point
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set out on a walking tour

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tour of Western Europe

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penologists made a tour of all the prisons in the state

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my next design was to make a tour round the island— Defoe

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left in September for a seven-week goodwill tour of northern and western Europe— Current Biog.

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Trip is the preferable word when referring to a relatively short journey, especially one for business or pleasure
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his new position requires frequent trips to New York

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the English came over in droves on the day trips—A. V. Davis

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surveys revealed that 59 percent of city-driver trips . . . were made for purposes of making a living— Americana Annual

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The term is also used in place of journey to refer to more extensive travels
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Conclusions I had reached on my trip around the world— Willkie

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a trip through western Pennsylvania, then down the Ohio— L. M. Sears

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Jaunt carries a stronger implication of casualness and informality than any of the others and is especially applicable to a short trip away from one's home or one's business, usually for pleasure or recreation
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they are off for a day's jaunt

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a jaunt to the shore or the hills— F. L. Allen

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lip service is paid ... to the idea of Congressional travel but the general tone throughout runs: They're off again on their jaunts at public expense— H. A. Williams

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Excursion applies to a brief pleasure trip, usually no more than a day in length
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the rural neighborhood of Sneyd, where they had been making an afternoon excursionBennett

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Excursion is the preferred term, especially in railroad and steamship use, for a round trip at reduced rates to a point of interest (as a resort or an exposition or a metropolis)
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the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern Ry. runs excursions to Bush Lake on tournament days— Amer. Guide Series: Minn.

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When the excursion involves a voyage of some days or weeks and, often, a sight-seeing tour with frequent stops during which the participants use the ship as their living quarters, cruise is the usual term
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a Mediterranean cruise

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the steamship lines are featuring winter cruises through the Caribbean Sea

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their yacht is off with a party on a cruise

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Expedition applies to a journey intended to further a definite purpose
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he called this trip frankly a begging expeditionCather

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he made a special expedition to the city to try to straighten out the difficulty

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had charge of the expedition to observe the transit of Venus in China— Rufus

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an archaeological expedition

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Pilgrimage applies primarily to an expedition to a place hallowed by religious associations but is sometimes applied also to a journey to a place of historical or sentimental association
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Arabs make pilgrimages to worship at his tomb— Hichens

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an excited conference at Niagara Falls in 1905 and the fervid pilgrimage to Harpers Ferry ... were tokens of the Negroes' obdurate consciousness of their identity— Handlin

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Often it implies an arduous journey or slow and difficult passage
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Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories told by men and women on a pilgrimage to the tomb of St. Thomas a Becket at Canterbury

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New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • Journey — Datos generales Origen San Francisco (California) …   Wikipedia Español

  • Journey — в 2008 году (слева направо: Росс Вэлори, Джонатан Кейн, Арнел Пинеда, Нил Шон и Дин Кастроново) …   Википедия

  • Journey — Jour ney, n.; pl. {Journeys}. [OE. jornee, journee, prop., a day s journey, OF. jorn[ e]e, jurn[ e]e, a day, a day s work of journey, F. journ[ e]e, fr. OF. jorn, jurn, jor a day, F. jour, fr. L. diurnus. See {Journal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Journey — may refer to:* Journey (band), an American rock band ** Journey (album), their 1975 debut album ** Journey (video game), an arcade game which featured the band ** Journey Escape , a video game for the Atari 2600, which also featured the band *… …   Wikipedia

  • Journey G — (Сеул,Южная Корея) Категория отеля: 3 звездочный отель Адрес: 542 8, Sinsa dong, Каннам гу …   Каталог отелей

  • journey — [jʉr′nē] n. pl. journeys [ME journee < OFr < VL * diurnata, day s journey, day s work < LL diurnum, a daily portion < L diurnus, daily < dies, day: see DEITY] 1. the act or an instance of traveling from one place to another; trip 2 …   English World dictionary

  • Journey — Allgem …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • journey — [n] excursion adventure, airing, beat, campaign, caravan, circuit, constitutional, course, crossing, drive, expedition, exploration, hike, itinerary, jaunt, junket, march, migration, odyssey, outing, passage, patrol, peregrination, pilgrimage,… …   New thesaurus

  • Journey — Jour ney, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Journeyed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Journeying}.] To travel from place to place; to go from home to a distance. [1913 Webster] Abram journeyed, going on still toward the south. Gen. xii. 9. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Journey — Jour ney, v. t. To traverse; to travel over or through. [R.] I journeyed many a land. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English